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They say solitude is your best teacher.

This week, I did a rough estimate and realize it takes about 15 people slots per week to accommodate to my lifestyle. Unlike some people, I simply cannot stand staying at home, hence I pack my week with activities – activities that are normally done with other peoples. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper. Movies, drinking, sports, chill. Teaching, sharing, playing, chatting. In a sense, it takes 15 people just to deal with one Zachary, per week.

I must be really taxing to befriend!

I obviously do not have the luxury of such company while I’m in Montreal. Yet, I have so many people envious of my 3 days week in McGill. Honestly, what would you do with the remanding 5 days? There is only so much traveling, sightseeing, exploring and playing you can pack into it. Some of my friends are “luckier”. They have mid terms, tests and homework to complete before they can enjoy a fraction of my freedom before their week ends and they turn the hourglass again.

We often ask for more time, but when we actually get it, how do you intend to spend it?

It may be liberating at the start, but it would not take long for it to turn mundane. Eventually, it would decompose into boredom and we might even turn to the desperate resort of killing time. What a tragedy! The amateur solution to the problem would be to punctuate it with activities. We institute milestones by chucking in the bungee jumps, skiing trips, watch the first snow fall and steal trips across the borders. We categorize the days of our lives into two types – the special days and the non-special days. The non-special days are spent on looking forward to the special days. Period.

It is like reading through a sentence looking for the punctuation marks. We breeze through entire paragraphs of our lives just like that.

The other way is to enjoy the unremarkable days. To find joy in the simple and the ordinary. To accept that they make up the majority of our life and to skip them would be to attempt murder on the bulk of our lives.

To enjoy both the words as well as the punctuation marks.

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